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General Inquiry Contact Form - Responsive contact us page design layout. Designer: Designer: An anonymous CodePen user. Use best web.


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SunnyVille Marketing is an ever growing company based in Grand Forks,Nd. Designers who signup on CodePen can share custom HTML, JavaScript, and CSS snippets to the website. com Sep 10, · CodePen.


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I think that was not a good move, maybe. It was mostly just a design deliverable. So through talking to users, doing some one-on-one interviews, going and watching different people—obviously people around the Sparkbox office use CodePen and love it. That number of six is kind of a big deal, that Katie mentioned. There were screenshots and we were posting little things on Dribbble. That was pretty nice; that was good for QA reasons before launch. Oh, that was so random. Like, literally bugs. You can find her tweeting about websites and pop culture. So, six ended up being the right decision for performance reasons and layout grid reasons. When you ask everybody involved in this thing, it was like we got crazy ideas. Hi, this is a Responsive Web Design Podcast, where we interview the people who make responsive designs happen. I was way into it. I did see a couple comments on Twitter that people said it feels faster, so that was a win in my book. You know what I bet both of you have, is some really good advice for other people.{/INSERTKEYS}{/PARAGRAPH} And this week, Ethan and I are not worthy. It was kind of a nightmare. There was a lot of legitimate research, which took the form of audio interviews and stuff—and Katie led most of this, so you should probably be talking about it. So, the way that I might phrase this question is: some organizations opt to use some adaptive designs on the front-end to solve for a particular layout or particular device-specific problems that they maybe could handle responsively but they opt not to. How did you think about staging the rollout and communicating changes to the product to your customers? Katie Kovalcin is a designer at Sparkbox. That was kind of my reaction. The idea of pairing, that was when we were at our best when we were working on this project. I found that I was the most conservative one. But yeah, CodePen is kind of my baby, and super-recently we undertook a major redesign of it, which Katie, in a sense, headed up. We have the separate redesign site where we were documenting everything about our process in the open, so people were following along, which really helped to tap into that community of people that really love CodePen and want it to be this really awesome thing, this community that they want to be a part of. And then it was all hands on deck when it dropped. Why not bring it to your company? Thanks for having us! It ended up being more formal than I expected, and it followed what seemed like a very professional and adult-like redesign process. Being able to make design decisions based on that ever-changing content of what people build on CodePen was pretty cool. We were also pretty conservative with the amount of fonts we were loading and stuff. Not really. And then we decided to just drop it all. Anyway, that was a minor thing. Before that even started though, I was a big fan of some of the kickoff exercises that we did which involved more people than normally happens in design. So, being able to make design decisions based on that ever-changing content of what people build on CodePen was pretty cool. She strongly values collaboration with her teammates, performance in design, and beautifully smart design systems. Then there were the super-users, like the people that create that beautiful artwork and are using all of the different features, the presentation features, private Pens, all of these more robust features. He writes about all things web at CSS-Tricks , talks about all things web at conferences around the world and on his podcast ShopTalk , and co-founded the web coding playground CodePen. And Chris, I have used your example, I think you wrote a blog post a couple years back about mixing responsive templates with separate mobile templates for CodePen. We saw the launch as an opportunity to get more feedback to iterate on. She co-hosts the Path to Performance podcast, writes about design for various publications, and speaks about design at conferences. We were using the actual Pens and usernames and things like that; it looked exactly like codepen. How did you know how to make those decisions? So we were using the actual Pens and usernames and things like that; it looked exactly like codepen. Chris is a web designer and developer. So, I would love to hear both of you talk about how some of those trade-offs have been made as part of this redesign, and if the product is not fully responsive yet, why is that? Let me ask about your rollout process. Literally nothing. You want to post them on our Facebook page? They love CodePen, they blog on it, all of those different things. But removing that seemed to be the trick for making it perceptually faster even though we actually did nothing for performance at all. And then, yeah, Chris figured out how that worked with the people running Sparkbox and what would be like a little fair trade. I even have the document right here in front of us, like they invented personas to typify some of our users and then imagined what they would need and want out of CodePen in the future kind of thing, and those personas guided our way through the redesign. It kind of, like, QAed itself. Not just how this thing was going to look and function, but how quickly it was going to be working? It was just this separate test site where we were able to work with the real content. You want to tweet us? And then that reduces our performance budget, as it were, for the rest of the site. I feel like I do actually less designing the more nitty gritty the responsive site gets. So that was a really, really big help. Last week! Six is also just a good number because it splits into grids pretty nicely. In fact, at responsivewebdesign. Want the latest episodes? Katie, let me follow up on that and ask how did you do that initial research and prioritization? But when you ask everybody involved in this thing, it was like we got crazy ideas. Everything you need to go responsive, in four short books. Yeah, and that was some really informal feedback that we were doing. And it was just CSS that did it, with a kind of animation delay on it. Now, personally, just speaking for myself, I love its invoicing and expense management. So, like, profile pages and maybe just how a Pen looks on a mobile device and things like that. Are you drinking this morning already? But, for example—there were many of them, but this was just one of them—was have everybody sketch an idea, and it was so eye-opening. We were already pretty okay, like I try to keep a pretty good lasso on that as far as speed, and we were in a pretty safe zone already. So take it, Katie. But whereas on the homepage, you come to that, everybody gets the same homepage, design decisions are made based on largely the width of the screen and stuff, so. And so there were definitely conversations around it. So, being able to just talk to a lot of different people and see the ways that people are using it, we were able to distill down to a couple of core different types of use cases, maybe not necessarily the type of user but the way that they use it. But there was a lot of stuff like that dealing with how Pens are handled and how heavy they are, and how we had to make design decisions based on that. That was cool. And then we had just kind of the, like, regular user who dabbles in a little bit of that stuff. The other really nice advantage about the CodePen community is how willing and open and excited all of the people that use and love CodePen are to give feedback and participate in those things. To handle a lot of the responsive decisions, a really, really big help in knocking that out was Chris actually came to the office and worked out of our office for a week. As somebody who is probably making the most decisions on what these pages are actually going to have and look like and be on, I probably have the final say in all that, my ideas for what the homepage would be were minor variations to what we already had. And they were able to do it on their own computer, in their own homes, you know? You want to email us, into support? So, anything that we can do to address speed in those iFrames is a good idea, which meant a lot of server-side caching and whatever, kind of helping people make good performance decisions inside of those things. And so then just getting kind of nuanced in the different types, and we did different surveys to get, kind of generally, the big numbers. Like, we did QA, we did lots of QA and device testing and stuff, but—. But I would recommend that to anybody, if you can point people to that kind of thing. So, we really were lucky to be able to utilize those people to inform a lot of those decisions. {PARAGRAPH}{INSERTKEYS}Gather Content: Their new free book, Content Delivery , helps teams put content-first, and deliver content on time. There was a lot of stuff like dealing with how Pens are handled and how heavy they are, and how we had to make design decisions based on that. Harvest bills itself as a beautiful business tool for tracking time spent on client projects. And there were, of course. One of the big questions that seems to come up with responsive designs is how do you make good choices about the priority of different objects or different features as they reflow across different screen sizes. In the early days of CodePen, we had twelve or something, and then we broke it down to nine, and then eight, which is 2x4, and then six.